Hurricane Dorian is a tropical cyclone that just impacted the Bahamas in a devastating way. Also threatening the Southeastern United States coastline causing a panic among the Miami Dade and Broward residents.

On August 24 Dorian developed from a tropical wave in the Central Atlantic before gradually intensifying and becoming a category 4 hurricane around August 28. Then in the next few days becoming a category 5 that was parked right over the Island of Great Abaco and Grand Bahamas. With winds of 185 mph and land fall tides. Hurricane Dorian has become the strongest landfall hurricane in the Atlantic ocean. With heavy rainfalls, prolonged storm conditions and storm surge damage in the Bahamas which has been extensive. 

In the United States mostly in Florida, Georgia, North and South Carolina and Virginia declared a state of emergency, especially in Florida where the storm was originally headed and expected to ravish through Miami.

The panic of Hurricane Dorian’s arrival caused many Miami Dade and Broward residents to prepare cautiously. All across Miami Dade and throughout many residents were clearing out bottled water and food in a panicked frenzy. Isles and isles were empty, with no water, canned goods or bread available. Gas stations had a mile long line that often resulted in empty gas stations with no more gas or propane. Many even sold out Home Depot in hopes of getting sand and plywood to prepare for the expected devastation but luckily “we were spared” says one Miami Dade resident. Which is completely in contrast to what Bahamian residents experienced as Hurricane Dorian traveled along the Caribbean. 

Bahamian prime minister, Hubert Minnis, stated that Hurricane Dorian left “generational devastation” and is asking for prayers for the family of the people that have lost their lives in this hurricane. The death count has already reached 30 people and it is expected to rise as rescuers continue to search through the devastation. Houses are destroyed, light post are downs, trees cover the street, massive flooding and people left traumatized from losing their home and all their personal belongings. 

One of the most tragic stories is the 8 year old boy whose grandmother reported his drowning as the waters rose.

“I just saw my grandson about two days ago,” McIntosh said. “He told me he loved me. He was going back to Abaco, he turned around and said, ‘Grandma, I love you.’’ The grandma found the boy’s body but reports her other granddaughter is still missing.

More are expected to be found but “the conditions are still dire” authorities say making it very difficult to continue rescuing or searching for casualties of the Dorian. Now another concern is the flooding caused by Dorian with rainfall that has lead to 24-30 inches of rain in the northwestern parts of the Bahamas. Authorities suggest “residents should not leave the shelters or surviving homes until conditions subside” 

In the Abaco Islands 60% of the homes are destroyed which has cause many residents to be homeless. Many residents affected by Dorian are speaking out. Krystel Brown of The Nassau Guardian newspaper got a chance to speak to Adrian Farrington who she encountered in Princess Margaret hospital in Nassau, the capital. Airlifted from Abaco, Farrington braved the storm with his young son on his back. Brown reports that Farrington had to resort to finding shelter in others’ home “putting my son on the roof” at one point. Farrington reports having put his son on the roof to protect him from the storm surge but the wind knocked his son off and he has not seen his son since. 

Farrington made it to a church after this traumatic incident having to crawl as he found a nearby church since he suffered a broken leg. At the church he was still not out of harm’s way as he watched the walls sway eventually collapsing on the other residents taking shelter in the church.

“I don’t know if there are any survivors” Farrington said. Rescue and International search teams continue to search carefully through the island for casualties and those in need of rescue. Very poor neighborhoods have suffered the worst with total devastation in their area. British Royal navy vessels have been distributing food and water and many in the United States have been sending donations over to the Island.

All throughout this week in Miami Dade there have been donation collection trying to assemble as much as they can gather from local residents. Water, canned goods and other necessities are very much welcomed in the Miami Dade and Broward donation centers. 

Remember right now we are comfortable and blessed as the storm didn’t impact us directly and the fact that we were out of danger should cause us to help. Every little help counts so please make sure to contribute to the relief efforts for the Bahamas.I pray for the families and friends of the victims that were affected by this horrible natural disaster and hope we can all work together to help the residents in the Bahamas. 

Here is the main website where you can help if you are located anywhere around the world:

https://www.bahamas.com/relief

Previous articleRelief efforts for the Bahamas in Miami Dade
Astharte De Los Santos is the Editor of Dade Christian Voice. She is a Digital Content Writer who is focused on writing content about Mental Health and Substance Abuse. Her articles have been published on Selfgrowth.com and Equilibrium Magazine UK. As a poet she has been on numerous publications such as the “Ny Literary Magazine”, SkinonSkin by Madison Lake, Suny Empire State College “The Student Connection”. Astharte has her bachelor’s in Human Services with a concentration on diversity from Suny Empire State College. She is currently studying for her Master’s degree in Liberal Arts with a focus on writing and plans to publish her first book next year in 2018. Astharte has a personal blog very special to her called Open Talk with God. There she has an open conversation with God touching on issues that other’s may struggle with in their spiritual journey. She is grateful to God for all His blessings, and volunteers at her church writing content for their blog.

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